Andres Bonifacio: The Betrayal of a Hero

Andres Bonifacio: The Betrayal of a Hero

Andres Bonifacio y de Castro, the father of Philippine Revolution and Philippine Democracy, was executed by firing squad by Gen Lazaro Makapagal and four other soldiers at Mount Nagpatong, Maragondon, Cavite on May 10, 1897. Who ordered the execution? Read the article and find out.

According to Teodoro A Agoncillo and Milagros C Guerrero in the “History of the Filipino People,” the katipuneros gathered around a flickering table lamp, performed the ancient blood compact, and signed their membership papers with their own blood. They vowed to liberate the Philippines from the tyranny of Spanish friars and civil guards through force of arms.

Under Bonifacio’s leadership, the Katipunan had three objectives: civic, moral, and political. The civic aim revolved around the principle of self-help and the defense of the poor and the oppressed. The moral goal was for hygiene, good morals, good manners, and attacking obscurantism and religious fanaticism. The political objective was separation from Spain through force of arms.

On August 23, 1896, at the yard of Juan Ramos y Aquino, the son of Melchora Ramos y Aquino, also known as Tandang Sora and considered as the Mother of the Katipunan, in Pugadlawin, Balintawak, now Quezon City, Bonifacio asked his fellow katipuneros whether they were prepared to fight to the bitter end. Despite the objection of Teodoro Plata, his brother in law, all katipuneros agreed to fight for freedom until their last breath. He then led his men in tearing their cedulas as a symbol of their determination to take up arms and to defy the Spanish colonial government. As the men torn their cedulas, they shouted, “Long live the Philippines!”

On August 30, 1896, Bonifacio and his men, fought the first battle of the Philippine Revolution. Leading 800 katipuneros, Bonifacio attacked a gunpowder storehouse in San Juan del Monte, now Pinaglabanan in the City of San Juan. The storehouse was an important military post of the Spanish army, but it was only defended by a hundred men. Outnumbered, the Spaniards retreated to El Deposito, the place where they stored water supply for Intramuros in Manila. Encouraged by the retreat of the Spaniards, Bonifacio and his men advanced toward Manila where they met an army of Spanish soldiers sent by Governor General Ramon Blanco. Bonifacio and his men were driven to Mandaluyong where more than 150 katipuneros died and another 200 others were captured.

Months later, the Katipunan was divided into two revolutionary groups: the Magdiwangs, which was headed by Bonifacio and the Magdalos, which was headed by Gen Emilio Aguinaldo y Famy. To resolve the issue whether the Katipunan should be superseded by another government, a revolutionary assembly was conducted in Barrio Tejeros, San Francisco de Malabon, now General Trias, Cavite on March 22, 1897. With Bonifacio as chairman, the assembly agreed that a central revolutionary government should be established to replace the Katipunan. He then reluctantly presided over the election and secured the unanimous decision of the assembly to abide by the decision of the majority. General Aguinaldo was elected president although he was absent because he was at the military front in Pasong Santol, now Barangay Anabu II, in Imus, Cavite. The Magdiwangs who were supposed to support Bonifacio did not even vote for him for president or vice president. Instead, Bonifacio was elected director of the interior.

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Alixander Haban Escote, posted this comment on Jun 10th, 2008

REFERENCES:

Agoncillo, Teodoro A and Milagros C Guerrero. History of the Filipino People. Quezon City: R P Garcia Publishing Company, 1977.

De los Santos, Epifanio (1955). The Revolutionists: Aguinaldo, Bonifacio, and Jacinto. Edited by Teodoro A Agoncillo. Manila: National Historical Institute, 1993.

Dumol, Paul A and Ernesto D Grio. A History of the Filipino People for High Schools. First Edition. City of Makati: Sinag-Tala Publishers, Inc., 2002.

Medina, Isagani R. Heroes of the Revolution: Andres Bonifacio. Online. Internet. Available URL: http://www.bakbakan.com/heroes.html.

Paular Regino P and Carminda R Arevalo. Kalendaryong Pangkasaysayan 1521-1969. Manila: Ang Pambansang Suriang Pangkasaysayan, 1996.

Jo, posted this comment on Jun 10th, 2008

Congratulations for a factual narration of the history. I hope historians will write in this manner. They should provide us with the truth in order to enlighten us.

Alixander Haban Escote, posted this comment on Jun 10th, 2008

Jo, thank you very much for your very heart-warming comments. Also, thank you very much for reading my article. Cheers!

kabotage, posted this comment on Jun 13th, 2008

thanks for sharing a great narration of history sir. Bonifacio was the first president as far as i know. Your a journalist and wrote 2 books, i saw it on google. thanks!

Alixander Haban Escote, posted this comment on Jun 21st, 2008

Kabotage, thank you very much for reading my article. I got the following article in Filmag, May 12, 1997, p. 18. You might want to read it:

SINO ANG UNANG PRESIDENTE NG PILIPINAS?

May mga historyador na naniniwalang dapat ituwid ang kasaysayan ng Filipinas at kilalanin si Andres Bonifacio, isa sa tagapagtatag ng Katipunan, bilang presidente ng Unang Republika.

Noong Agosto 24, 1896 itinatag in Bonifacio ang isang rebolusyonaryong pamahalaan.

Bago magkadigma, maraming historyador ang kumilalakay Bonifacio at sa kanyang gobyerno.

Ayon kay John R M Taylor, Amerikanong military historian at tagapag-ingat ng Philippine Insurgent Records, and Kataastaasang Kapulungan ng Katipunan ay isinaayos ni Bonifacio bilang insurgent government of the Philippines.

Kinilala rin ni Gregorio F Zaide ang rebolusyonaryong gobyerno ni Bonifacio. Gayundin ang naging palagay nina Teodoro Agoncillo, Jose P Bantung, at Jose P Santos.

Sa isang artikulo tungkol sa Rebolusyong 1896 na nalathala sa La Illustracion Española y Americana, ang larawan ni [Andres] Bonifacio ay kinilalang Titulado Presidente de la Republica Tagala.

Panahon na para baguhin ang aklat-pangkasaysayan at kilalanin si Bonifacio bilang unang presidente ng Filipinas.

Vicson Aypa Mabanglo, posted this comment on Jun 21st, 2008

Thank you for sharing a bit fact about our history.

Sir, did I understand the article correctly? Gen. Emilio Aguinaldo is the one to blame for Andres Bonifacio’s execution? Am I right?

I thought that the rumor, about Gen. Emilio Agunaldo as one of the main cause of Andres Bonifacio’s execution, was not true. I was exposed to this rumor since I was grade 5. I remember the time when my teacher in history, Sir Michael Cabrera, taught as that confusing fact. Gen. Aguinaldo is a traitor, therefore. Am I right, sir? I can’t accept the fact that they, as members of the same historical group of Katipunan, were actually not cooperating with each other. Emilo Aguinaldo, if I’m not mistaken, is a low-quality type of general ( pardon to the supporters of Gen Emilo Aguinaldo ). He envied so much about the leadership of Bonifacio. I guess, if both of them had helped each other, we should have gained the independence from the Spaniards earlier. I guess, though it sounds a bit hurting, we, Filipino people have really the characteristic of “crab mentality”. Speechless.

Sir, again, thank you for those data and information. It liberated me from the clutches of ignorance. It cleared my mind from a question that was stacked for a long period of time. Thank you sir.

Alixander Haban Escote, posted this comment on Jun 22nd, 2008

Actually, Gen Emilio Aguinaldo y Famy run against President Manuel Luis Quezon y Molina in the 1935 Presidential Election, but he lost because of the Andres Bonifacio y De Castro controversy. He was later advised not to run for any political office because of it. For more information, read Dr Isagani R Medina’s Heroes of the Revolution: Andres Bonifacio at http://www.bakbakan.com/heroes.html

Thank you very much for reading my article. Please share it. Cheers!

gregsonedd, posted this comment on Jun 23rd, 2008

sir, can i post your article in my blog? http://gregsonedd.multiply.com
I’m really one big big history fan and idolizes bonifacio’s ideals.

Marian Denise Glipo Basallote, posted this comment on Jun 24th, 2008

Sir, your article is truly an interesting one. I believe that it is one of the most controversial issues our country has ever faced. Until this time, I do hear a lot about the same controversy regarding Andres Bonifacio. There was even a time when I had found out that others, if asked about their opinions, would have wanted Bonifacio as our national hero.

Alixander Haban Escote, posted this comment on Jun 24th, 2008

Hi, gregsonedd, yes, you may post my article in your blog but using only the following:

ANDRES BONIFACIO: THE BETRAYAL OF A HERO
By Alixander Haban Escote

Andres Bonifacio y de Castro, the father of Philippine Revolution and Philippine Democracy, was executed to death by firing squad by Gen Lazaro Makapagal and four other soldiers at Mount Nagpatong, Maragondon, Cavite on May 10, 1897. But, who ordered the execution? Read the article and find out.

Andres Bonifacio y de Castro, born in Tondo, Manila on November 30, 1863 to Santiago Bonifacio and Catalina de Castro and married to Gregoria de Jesus, the Lakambini of the Katipunan, is the father of the Philippine Revolution and Philippine Democracy.

Bonifacio founded the premiere crusader of the Philippine Independence, the “Kataastaasang Kagalanggalangang Katipunan ng mga Anak ng Bayan” (Highest and Most Respectable Society of the Sons of the People) or the Katipunan at a house in Calle Azcarraga, now Claro Mayo Recto Street, in Tondo, Manila, on the night of July 7, 1892, the night when Dr Jose Protacio Mercado Rizal y Alonzo Realonda, the national hero of the Philippines, was deported to Dapitan, now City of Dapitan, in Zamboanga Del Norte. Together with Ladislao Diwa and Teodoro Plata, Bonifacio formed the first triangle of the Katipunan. With them were Jose Dizon, Valentin Diaz, Pio Valenzuela, Deodato Arellano, and Emilio Jacinto, who served as Bonifacio’s secretary and adviser on fiscal matters.

According to Dr Teodoro A Agoncillo in the “History of the Filipino People,” the katipuneros gathered around a flickering table lamp, performed the ancient blood compact, and signed their membership papers with their own blood. They vowed to liberate the Philippines from the tyranny of Spanish friars and civil guards through force of arms.

Continue reading the article at http://www.quazen.com/Reference/Biography/Andres-Bonifacio-The-Betrayal-of-a-Hero.111603

You may also visit http://philippineartsandculture.blogspot.com/search/label/PERSONALITIES where you can obtain a picture or two of Andres Bonifacio that you may use, acknowledging, of course, the source just like what I did.

Also, thank you very much for visiting our blog and thank you for reading my article. I hope you learn something. Cheers!

Alixander Haban Escote, posted this comment on Jun 24th, 2008

Marian, thank you very much for your very warm comments. Unfortunately, I am not a big Andres Bonifacio fan. I like Dr Jose P Rizal better than him. However, you may want to read Renato Constantino’s Veneration Without Understanding, which was delivered during the Third National Rizal Lecture on December 30, 1969.

Marie Juliebeth Monge, posted this comment on Jun 25th, 2008

Sir, this article is very intriguing and at the same time, it is interesting. It is such a shame that some people would go to as far as killing others just to get the so-called “POWER”. Come to think of it, it is not only practiced in Andres Bonifacio’s time, its happening also in our generation.

Alixander Haban Escote, posted this comment on Jun 26th, 2008

Jeb, remember that General Emilo Aguinaldo established a dictatorial government upon the recommendation of Apolinario Mabini. I think that explains the situation during that time.

Anyways, thank you for dropping by. Cheers!

Vladimir Paat Villegas, posted this comment on Jun 26th, 2008

This article is very detailed. When I studied in elementary, all I knew about Bonifacio was that he was betrayed by his own associates in KKK. But for those who are still curious enough, I would just like to suggest reading “Bonifacio’s Bolo” by Ambeth Ocampo. For some other heroes’ opinions about Bonifacio, I would like to suggest “Rizal Without the Overcoat” by Ambeth Ocampo.

Alixander Haban Escote, posted this comment on Jun 26th, 2008

Vladimir, for a more detailed readings about Andres Bonifacio y De Castro, look for Bones of Contention: The Bonifacio Lectures, and about Dr Jose Protacio Mercado Rizal y Alonzo Realonda, Meaning and History: The Rizal Lectures, both written by Ambeth R Ocampo. Cheers!

(JOEBACS) Joeromer Bacus, posted this comment on Jun 30th, 2008

Thank you Sir Alixander! My history teacher told us about the betrayal of Bonifacio but it wasnt that clear as what you have posted. The reason why Ive found this page coz im doing a research for a national hero. I’m a fan of war/revolutionary movies like Patriot, Enemy at the gates, the pianist, Schindler’s list, and Micheal Collins. I am hoping that someday a filipino film maker will be inspired to create a world class movie (Bonifacio)and we can share your it to the world our history and it will inspires our filipino youth as well. Your info is so useful! Mabuhay tayo mga Filipino!

Alixander Haban Escote, posted this comment on Jun 30th, 2008

Hi, Joeromer, thank you very much for visiting our blog and for reading my article. For a more detailed reading about Andres Bonifacio y De Castro, look for Bones of Contention: The Bonifacio Lectures, which are available in Fullybooked and in National Book Store. You will learn that it was only Bonifacio who was not given a proper burial among our national heroes.

Ma. Beatrice Camille Valencia Gaviola, posted this comment on Jul 5th, 2008

Sir, this article is truly an interesting one.

Had I not read this, I would have no idea about this controversy. I do not recall hearing about it, or maybe I just do not remember. Anyayw, I cannot believe that two powerful people of the same organization would have a disagreement as huge as that, that it would end up in one getting executed.

In my opinion, they both have faults in this situation. Bonifacio took back what he said about the vote of the majority being final, and Aguinaldo let someone else influence his decision.

I do agree with Jeb when she says that these things still happen up to now.

Ma. Beatrice Camille Valencia Gaviola, posted this comment on Jul 5th, 2008

Sir, sorry, I only noticed now that I misspelled the word “anyway” in my comment.

Dominique Josine Gonzalez Directo, posted this comment on Jul 7th, 2008

A truly interesting article on our history. I have heard the rumor that General Emilio Aguinaldo ordered the execution of Bonifacio and his brother. Power is really a motivating force for some people. It is a pity that Aguinaldo chose to antagonize an ally just to gain the upper hand in the Katipunan. The outcome might have been better if they just helped each other on their goals.

carl, posted this comment on Jul 14th, 2008

Some analytical historians like Alejo Villanueva claim that what happened at Tejeros, Cavite was actually a coup de etat to wrest power from Bonifacio by the bourgeois or upper class represented by Aguinaldo. (Aguinaldo and members of his class enjoyed more privilege status even before the revolution. They would not allow a victorious president Bonifacio ordering land and wealth distribution as his first decree.) Hence, the Tejeros Convention was a farce intended to lure Bonifacio to the Caviteño territory. The presidential election wasn’t a national election at all. Participation in the election primarily came from Caviteños. The other provinces in revolt, such as Bulacan, Pampanga, Tarlac, Laguna, and Batangas, were not participants. Bonifacio, who was too fueled with idealism, was too naive to understand maneuvering politicians. Had Bonifacio been able to get back to Manila he could have charged Aguinaldo and other Caviteño officers with treason and Philippine history would have taken a very different track. Bonifacio was not allowed to get out of Cavite. He was summarily tried then executed promptly at a mountain in Maragondon, Cavite for treason.

Eugene Shinn, posted this comment on Aug 8th, 2008

Well Written Article,sir maybe next time you can write about another Aguinaldo “victim” Gen Antonio Luna and the reasons behind his death which was in a way similar to bonifacio’s as they were both killed by fellow filipinos and both execution was ordered by Aguinaldo.

AntiBeast, posted this comment on Sep 14th, 2008

Carefully written and well-researched article. Contrary to popular opinion, it is Emilio Aguinaldo who should be considered the National Hero of both the Katipunan Revolution of 1896 and the Philippine Revolution of 1898 instead of Jose Rizal or Andres Bonifacio. Here’s why:

From your article, Andres Bonifacio acted like a pathetic loser who could not accept his electoral defeat in the Tejeros Convention. His own men, the Magdiwangs did not want to elect him as the President or Vice-President and chose instead to elect Emilio Aguinaldo, a Magdalo, as the President of the Revolutionary Government. When he felt insulted, he even drew a gun and then left to form a counter-revolutionary army and government.

As Head of a Military Dictatorship in a time of war, Aguinaldo had every reason to order the execution of Bonifacio whose actions were not only divisive but treasonous as well. It was Aguinaldo whose military prowess was proven in the early battles against the Spaniards in Cavite. That’s why he rose quickly through the ranks. In contrast, Bonifacio’s first battle on August 30, 1896 against the Spaniards in Mandaluyong led to the deaths of 150 and the capture of another 200 (out of 800) Katipuneros.

Despite his idealism, Andres Bonifacio was largely ineffective as either a political leader or military strategist.

As for Jose Rizal, he disowned the Katipunan Revolution of 1896 as it broke out and sided with the Spaniards by accepting his commission as a medical doctor in the Spanish Army in Cuba. Such an act in times of war is called TREASON.

max vril, posted this comment on Sep 16th, 2008

to you abeast,
it was not true that men of bonifacio voted for aguinald;there was ballot switching that it appeared as though aguinaldo won landslide.if not due ballot switching bonifacio was the president.

ericrizal, posted this comment on Sep 18th, 2008

To you BEAST: Better get hold of facts before you say that Dr. Jose Rizal committed treason and that Gat. Andres Bonifacio was largely an ineffective leader.

cavite boy, posted this comment on Sep 27th, 2008

to max vril:
what ballot switching? it is beacause the majority of magdiwangs are also caviteno and bonifacio is losing the war . . . take note, only few magdalos attend the convention . . . still ballot switching? ? ?

Anna, posted this comment on Oct 27th, 2008

Andres was so concern of our Country…..

kutonglupa, posted this comment on Oct 28th, 2008

Up to now this misconception of Emilio Aguinaldo being a hero is being savored by almost all true blooded cavitenyos. they blindly believe they have the hero’s blood in them, even though so much items and articles depicted Aguinaldo as a traitor and a makapili during the japanese occupation, even asking gen. McArthur to surrender to the japanese. there should be efforts by the phil govt to straigthen these distortions in phil history.
i’m not a fan of Bonifacio, really, but, i give him due respect.

multidifficulti, posted this comment on Nov 5th, 2008

http://multidifficulti.wordpress.com/2008/09/22/the-betrayal-of-the-katipunan-revolution-by-moro%e2%80%99s-and-marxists/ on my dutch blog.
Greetings from Multidifficulti

yob etivac , posted this comment on Nov 12th, 2008

kutonglupa, sang-ayon ako sa’yo! cavite boy, huwag mo pairalin ang redyonalismo. Bakit ba MAGDALO at hindi MAGDIWANG ang tawag sa grupong binuo ni Sen. Trillanes? Dahil ba siya ay kabitenyo? Taga-hanga ako ni emilio aguinaldo at si Andres bonifacio naman ang bayani ko!

Julian Makabayan, posted this comment on Nov 13th, 2008

Alam nyo b na 3 beses nag-resign c Aguinaldo bilang Presidente ngunit tinutulan ito ng Kongreso ng Malolos? Alam nyo b ang dahilan?

chinny, posted this comment on Nov 15th, 2008

…the information helps…a lot:D

****zychiniah****, posted this comment on Nov 16th, 2008

Andres Bonifacio is such a great hero!…

Rafza, posted this comment on Nov 16th, 2008

Andres started it all period, if not for him wala silang lahat!

paul, posted this comment on Nov 18th, 2008

sir please can you give me atleast 2 articles about controversial issued concerning Dr. Jose Rizal.

gerald salazar, posted this comment on Dec 3rd, 2008

paki lagyan naman ng picture1

Roland, posted this comment on Dec 6th, 2008

As a BSE History student, i can make this conclusion.What transpire between Bonifacio and Aguinaldo is a vivid proof of what kind of politics we have in our country.It is dirty and corrupt in nature.

Jesusa, posted this comment on Dec 10th, 2008

Antibeast, what a ridiculous post you got there. Andres Bonifacio was an organizational genius responsible for the nationwide formation of the Katipunan. It’s Aguinaldo who proved ineffective as a leader when he took the Americans as allies when they were in fact really planning to colonize the Philippines.

You’re obviously reading only what you want to see, or misleading others into minimizing the great contributions of Bonifacio to the fight for Philippine independence. Then again, you’re militant enough to denounce Rizal’s repudiation of the revolution. I suspect that you couldbe a descendant of either Aguinaldo, or of the infamous Daniel Tirona….

Roland, posted this comment on Dec 18th, 2008

AntiBeast, how pitiful that you consider a power greedy Aguinaldo as a hero! Yes Bonifacio never won a single war, but this was made possible because of Teodoro Patino’s treachery. Bonifacio’s plan should have been a success if the Katipunan was not revealed prematurely!
And how could you say such things to Rizal? He is not against the revolution per se but he was against an unprepaired battle!

junrezzz, posted this comment on Jan 1st, 2009

the betrayal of a hero. all i can say is that emilio aguinaldo was THE FIRST FILIPINO CRAB………..

Mae, posted this comment on Jan 2nd, 2009

I think this will be pretty good if you lay some Pics not about you but about those people like Emilo Aguinaldo and etc.

Alex, posted this comment on Jan 20th, 2009

Hi Alixander. I am doing a research paper on Aguinaldo.. If he is a murderer of hero. If it’s possible, can you help me? Thanks!

JUAN, posted this comment on Mar 6th, 2009

MALI dapat tagahanga ako at bayani ko si andres bonifacio, taksil sa bayan at gahaman sa kapangyarihan yang si aguinaldo

timo boll, posted this comment on Mar 18th, 2009

baguhin ang history books natin!..ipaalam sa mga kabataan ngayon ang tutoong nangyari sa Pilipinas nung taong 1896-1897, at di pa naman huli ang lahat..iniisip ko lang kung ano ang nangyari na sa angkan nina Bonifacio at Rizal..sa tingin ko yung angkan ni Aguinaldo ay nagkakamal pa ng yaman at ng mga lupain!! Kung may kasalanan naman si Emilio Aguinaldo, sigurado namimilipit na sya ngayon sa tabi ni Satanas..

joy, posted this comment on Mar 19th, 2009

bad si aguinaldo..basta

joy, posted this comment on Mar 19th, 2009

haha.. npkajugdemental ko.. sorry..

basta mabuhay si Bonifacio!!

jeano, posted this comment on Mar 20th, 2009

Aguinaldo ang ngpapatay ky Bonifacio..Siya rin utak sa pagpatay kay Antonio Luna…Namatay si Greg.del Pilar dahil sa kanya…Sumuko si mIguel Malvar, ang huling heneral na agenst American dahil din sa kanya…sinuhulan pa siya nang pira na para sana sa mga rebelde, ibinulsa lang niya ang 400,000..naki alyado pa siya sa mga hapon during japanese invasion…at many to mention ung mga kabulastugan niya…hay naku kayu nalang humusga….di ako galit kay miyong peru yan ang totoo…

marga1gab@yahoo.com, posted this comment on Jun 12th, 2009

very nice article…..hope this can be lectured in all history classes…..it’s very informative…mabuhay ang lahat ng nakikibaka….

low_arq IGLPI, posted this comment on Jun 12th, 2009

Gat Andres Bonifacio = “Matapang na Pilipino”
Taga-Cavite man ako, ang agimat na dumadaloy sa dugo ko ay ang agimat ng katapangan ng Supremo.

cyclejerk, posted this comment on Jul 15th, 2009

Well, Aguinaldo continued to displace bonifacio even after the cavite incident. In our 1980s Five Peson paper bill it was the face of aguinaldo but by some twist of fate it was replaced with aguinaldo again…poor andres! Kaya ayun sinama na lang kay mabini sa ten peso bill na ngayon ay wala na rin sa sirkulasyon..tsk tsk tsk!

julius erving, posted this comment on Jul 29th, 2009

sana gawin na ng gma 7 ang andres bonofacio movie at ilagay lahat ang lahat ng mga tunay na nangyari nuong august23 1897 hanggang sa araw na pinatay ang magkapatid na bonifacio nuong may 10 1897 at sana mabago ang lahat ng storya sa libro at ilagay duon na ang unang presidente ng republika ng katagalugan o pilipinas ay si general and commander in chief andres bonifacio

julius erving, posted this comment on Jul 29th, 2009

august 23 1896 po nagkamali lang ng spelling saka bonifacio thanks

Kakarong, posted this comment on Aug 5th, 2009

They’re all heroes, what happened before were needed to shape our future. We can’t wish all of them to co-exist and besides all of them should be dead by now too. The American intervention and the ruling upper middle class are bigger issues in our history that we can still fight and change.

jackie, posted this comment on Sep 25th, 2009

they are all heroes but our history that we can still change & fight

jaekatrina, posted this comment on Oct 8th, 2009

hi..thank you for this article. it helped me a lot in my history subjects..

jovi, posted this comment on Nov 10th, 2009

but who is the true person who blame for the death of andres bonifaci??

Agnes Javier Tierney, posted this comment on Mar 13th, 2010

You’re great for writing this article. Otherwise the Filipinos will never know the truth. Hakahaka lang ang alam ko or most of the majority.
Emilio Aguinaldo did not really want him exexuted. The culprit here was General Noriel.
Gat Andres Bonifacio was a real hero. He was not even given a fair trial.

im_no_hero, posted this comment on Jun 9th, 2010

An intestesting article, and from the number of responses and comments, this subject really raises issues of what our forefathers/heroes are really like. What we know about our history comes from either what we learned in school or from sources we come along as we grow older, and during the discovery of new material pertaining to what we previously thought of as gospel truth to the version of history we know comes the realization that we still don’t know what we should or need to. Granted that events of the Katipunan revolution occured many generations ago, the reality that manipulation, coercion and insidous maneouvering of people within the government to gather more power and influence is as rampant today as it was then. Now that a new President has been elected and a new cabinet will be formed, the next chapter in the storied evolution of Philippine Politics will make its mark in history. As i write this now, a day after our new President has been proclaimed, i wonder what future Filipinos will read about our President, will they be appaled at the the discovery of unsavory decisions he made, or will they think of him as somebody who made a difference? whatever the case, it is us who read this article and commented on that will be affected, and hopefully, unlike what happened to Bonifacio, where news and facts have been blurred and forgotten due to the lack of facilities to disseminate information along with the control of such, this generation, through the use of the internet, sns, sms etc. will never allow another coverup, similar to the betrayal and death of Andres Bonifacio to happen again.

Soses, posted this comment on Dec 14th, 2010

The article is indeed very interesting.It really helped me answer my assignment in our history subject.Thanks.

watawat ng pilipinas, posted this comment on Jan 27th, 2011

isang napakagandang article !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

wala talaga akong masasabi

konsensya ng cavite, posted this comment on Feb 11th, 2011

Cavitenos should be ashamed of their ancestors! Aguinaldo is a usurper who had the true 1st president of the Philippines killed! Nothing is heroic about this ilustrado caviteno clown! For him, self interest comes 1st unlike Bonifacio or Sakay who fought for independence no matter what.

Heroes, posted this comment on Feb 13th, 2011

Ang bumaril kay Dr. Jose Rizal ay Filipino at ang Bumaril kay General Andres Bonifacio ay Filipino pa rin, are we Filipinos destined to end the life of our heroes? History repeats itself. Just look what’s happening right now in our goverment. They are fighting just for the personal gain for power. How sad that (us) filipinos still not achieved the true meaning of freedom that our ancestors and heroes have fought for and died for.

dbmh123, posted this comment on Feb 14th, 2011

dapat baguhin ang history books natin!..ipaalam sa mga kabataan ngayon ang tutoong nangyari sa Pilipinas nung taong 1896-1897.for me andres bonifacio is the first president of katagalugan o pilipinas.bonifacio was the real revolutionist and aguinaldo was a dirty politician who frequently switch sides to gain his personal agendas.

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